Ukraine emergency

When the invasion began, Yuliya’s family home was destroyed by shelling.

After months, Yuliya and her son were finally able to reach safety in Romania. On arrival in Bucharest, UNHCR supported them with cash assistance which helped Yuliya buy food and clothes for her son.

© UK for UNHCR/Ioana Epure

Ukraine emergency

When the invasion began, Yulia’s family home was destroyed by shelling. After months, Yulia & her son were finally able to reach safety in Romania. On arrival in Bucharest, UNHCR supported them with cash assistance. Photo: © UK for UNHCR/Ioana Epure

The war in Ukraine has forced some 6.4 million refugees to flee the country and over 3.6 million more people are internally displaced in Ukraine due to fighting.

Emergency shelter

to provide safety for those fleeing or left with damaged homes

 

 

Relief items and emergency payments

for the most vulnerable individuals, including winter relief and blankets

 

emergency-cash-icon

Community support

to help displaced people access social services and psychological support

What’s happening in Ukraine?

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has forced many people in Ukraine to flee their homes. As the war continues, humanitarian needs remain high both in Ukraine and in surrounding countries hosting refugees from Ukraine.

More than 6.4 million refugees from Ukraine have now crossed borders to seek safety. In addition, over 3.6 million people are internally displaced within Ukraine’s borders.

Despite the ongoing war, UNHCR is staying and delivering whilst providing relief operations across Ukraine and in neighbouring countries to support fleeing civilians. Urgent needs include shelter, relief items such as blankets, and specialist protection – all of which rely on voluntary donations.

How long has UNHCR been in Ukraine?

UNHCR has been working in Ukraine since 1994 and established a country office the following year in 1995, supporting refugees and asylum-seekers, stateless people, and internally displaced and other conflict-affected persons.

How has conflict in recent years led to displacement in Ukraine?

Since the beginning of the conflict in eastern Ukraine and the temporary occupation of Crimea in 2014, UNHCR has provided protection and humanitarian assistance on both sides of the contact line. This includes support for internally displaced people, refugees and stateless people in the country.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine in 2022 forced millions more people in Ukraine to flee their homes. An additional 3.6 million people have been displaced within Ukraine’s borders. 

UNHCR and its teams work in both Government controlled and non-Government controlled areas, and in neighbouring countries, delivering humanitarian assistance such as emergency shelter and psychological support to people in need.

Where are refugees from Ukraine fleeing to?

Neighbouring countries such as Poland, Hungary, Moldova, Romania and Slovakia have all accepted refugees from Ukraine and are providing refuge, supported by UNHCR teams. More than 6.4 million refugees from Ukraine have been recorded globally.

What support does UNHCR deliver?

With teams across Ukraine and in neighbouring countries hosting refugees from Ukraine, UNHCR is providing protection and humanitarian assistance, including emergency shelters, repairs for homes damaged by shelling, emergency cash assistance, and protection such as psychological support.

UNHCR has also provided training for Ukrainian civil society organisations involved in helping to protect refugees and other displaced families.   

During the coronavirus pandemic, UNHCR has worked to strengthen the capacity of health and social care providers in Ukraine, as well as advocating for asylum-seekers to have free, equal access to healthcare and vaccination against COVID-19.

What is the situation in Kharkiv?

A rise in hostilities in Kharkiv region, northeastern Ukraine, resulted in the evacuation of thousands of people from their villages in Kharkiv’s border areas. Humanitarian partners are rapidly mobilising to provide emergency assistance to both war-affected populations and those fleeing frontline areas.

In one week, more than 10,300 people were evacuated from their villages in Kharkiv region’s border areas by Ukrainian authorities with the help of volunteers and humanitarian organisations. People evacuated from frontline areas have been enrolled for emergency cash assistance at a transit centre in Kharkiv city through UNHCR partner Right to Protection (R2P), to help cover their immediate needs. Evacuees are also receiving psychosocial support through the State Emergency Service, and UNHCR partners Proliska and R2P. Additionally, R2P is providing legal assistance, including support with registering as an internally displaced person and applying for financial compensation for destroyed property.

How can I learn more about the situation in Ukraine?

To access the latest data and reports on UNHCR’s vital work in Ukraine, please visit the Ukraine Operations portal.

To find out more about UNHCR’s work in Ukraine, please visit UNHCR Ukraine.

The war in Ukraine has resulted in the biggest and fastest growing refugee crisis in Europe since the Second World War.

“Thank you for the support that you provided us with. You are doing great work, it is very important for people here.”

79-year-old Liudmyla was forced to flee her home near Kyiv to Fastiv and stayed there for three months. She returned to a house with a collapsed roof, broken doors & shattered windows. Emergency shelter kits can be quickly deployed to carry out makeshift repairs to houses like Liudmyla’s, ensuring homes are habitable. To support UNHCR’s work, please donate today.

©UNHCR/Victoria Andrievska

Case study image

“Thank you for the support that you provided us with. You are doing great work, it is very important for people here.”

79-year-old Liudmyla was forced to flee her home near Kyiv to Fastiv and stayed there for three months. She returned to a house with a collapsed roof, broken doors and shattered windows. Emergency shelter kits can be quickly deployed to carry out makeshift repairs to houses like Liudmyla’s, ensuring homes are habitable and the people within them protected from the elements. UNHCR’s work around the world relies on voluntary donations. To support UNHCR’s work, please donate today.

©UNHCR/Victoria Andrievska

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